Latest press articles for Synthetic Users

Synthetic Users and AI are transforming research methodologies, offering innovative, cost-effective alternatives to traditional human subject studies.

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A revolution in the way we conduct qualitative and quantitative research is underway. It's not here to replace organic research but to complement it. Here are just four articles that paint the vision we are working on, whilst mentioning our work and company directly (thank you!). Every company will have their own Synthetic Users, who will pro-actively help shape product and marketing by allowing us to make better decisions.

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Researchers Have Replaced Humans with Machines for Social Sciences Surveys

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A recent study from Brigham Young University revealed that AI could replace humans in polls, marketing studies, and sociological surveys by posing questions to AI models representing specific socio-economic profiles. This concept, supported by synthetic users, showed AI responses matching the distribution of U.S. election votes over several years. However, a French research team from the Center for Research in Economics and Statistics cautioned against this, finding that AI models often produced skewed and less diverse responses compared to humans. Despite these limitations, Hugo Alves, co-founder of Synthetic Users, remains optimistic about using AI for qualitative studies, emphasizing their ability to imitate desired profiles and enhance diversity. This ongoing exploration into AI's role in social science research highlights both potential and challenges.

πŸ”— https://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2024/05/23/quand-l-intelligence-artificielle-s-immisce-dans-les-sondages_6235082_1650684.html

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GUINEA PIGBOTS

Doing research with human subjects is costly and cumbersome. Can AI chatbots replace them?



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The article from Science discusses the use of LLMs, in replacing human subjects for behavioral experiments. Researchers found that these AI models can simulate human responses with significant accuracy, potentially revolutionizing social science research. However, there are concerns about biases from training data and the AI's tendency to "hallucinate" information. Despite these challenges, Synthetic Users and similar AI applications show promise in providing diverse, cost-effective, and rapid insights into human behavior, though careful bias management is crucial​.

πŸ”—https://www.science.org/content/article/can-ai-chatbots-replace-human-subjects-behavioral-experiments

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Shapes and frictions of synthetic data

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The SAGE journal article discusses the rise and implications of synthetic data, which are computer-generated datasets that mimic real-world data without directly corresponding to actual phenomena. Widely used in privacy protection, machine learning, and simulations, synthetic data is gaining traction in social sciences, including government applications like the US Census. The paper argues for a shift from traditional data representation models to relational models, where data are defined by their use, purpose, and context. Synthetic Users, an AI startup, exemplifies this trend by offering "user research without users," using large language models to generate simulated user feedback. This approach, while addressing privacy concerns and biases, also introduces new challenges related to data accuracy and trust. The article calls for a critical examination of synthetic data through a relational lens, emphasizing the importance of context and purpose in understanding and utilizing these datasets.

πŸ”— https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/20539517241249390

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Return of the People Machine

No one responds to polls anymore. Researchers are now just asking AI instead.

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‍The Atlantic article explores AI's potential to replace traditional polling methods through simulated human responses using LLMs. Brigham Young University researchers found AI effective in predicting voter behavior, offering a cost-effective alternative. However, experts warn that AI, while useful for trend analysis, can't fully replace human input due to outdated data and internet biases. Hugo Alves, co-founder of Synthetic Users, is optimistic about using AI for qualitative studies, emphasizing the role of artificial panels in enhancing data diversity.

πŸ”—https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2023/04/polls-data-ai-chatbots-us-politics/673610/

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